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South Korea - The place to train

New Zealand trainer, David Miller, is open for business in South Korea.

“I’m the first New Zealander to train here, “I’ve started to get horses into the stable, now I’ve 24 boxes and it won’t be hard to fill them.”

“The hardest part is getting the quality, there’s no problem with the quantity.”

The stables are on the track, with a swimming pool and walkers the facilities are quite good there.

Miller is based at Busan racecourse, which opened in 2005 with race meetings every Friday and Sundays.

“It’s the strongest racing here, even though Seoul is the capitol, all the big races are won by horses trained at Busan,” said Miller.

He can speak from experience since he was a jumps jockey in New Zealand, he rode during the winter and travelled in the summer, South Korea is the eleventh country where he has worked.

Miller who came from a training stint in Malaysia said, “There is a hefty starting up cost involved to train in South Korea.”

“I had to put down nearly $ US 90,000 to open a company, if things go well I should be making good money, “he said.

If a horse can run between first and eighth, it pays the training fees for a month.

A class one race can be worth $ US 100,000, and a class five and six can go up to $US 50,000, the trainer receives seven per cent, the jockey six per cent, and 10 per cent goes to the staff from the prize money.

You have to have four Korean bred horses before you can buy foreign horses at the sales.

 

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